Sojourners in the News

Source: Deseret News | Kelsey Dallas

Wallis grew up in Detroit in the 1950s and 1960s, gradually becoming aware of the city's complicated racial politics. His white church didn't acknowledge the struggles of the city's black residents, and he wanted to know why.

Why are thousands of churchgoing Christians supporting a political agenda that would ban immigrants from our shores, ignore growing income inequality, demean women and fail to address climate change?

Source: Baptist News Global | Jay Robinson

An invitation to come to the table can be warm and welcoming. Often it means someone has prepared a meal for us to enjoy. For me, the idea of coming to the table has taken on new significance over the past six years.

Waves of religious groups are mustering passionate get-out-the-vote efforts in the final hours before the heated midterm elections, with clergy pushing the faithful to the polls in ways that stand to aid both Republicans and Democrats.

As the 2018 midterm elections approach, the schisms suggest evangelical Christians, who make up a quarter of the population, may not be as solidly supportive of President Donald Trump and the Republican Party as many suspect.

Source: Financial Times | Madeleine Davies

Madeleine Davies explains why she isn’t giving up on the movement despite its support for the president.

A diverse group of evangelicals is joining forces to reclaim a faith tradition it says has become dominated by older, conservative white men who are blindly loyal to President Donald Trump and the Republican Party.

Source: NPR | All Things Considered

"Well, I think these issues are much deeper than politics. Many of us feel politically homeless these days, but the racial divide is of deep concern to me. So when white evangelicals say to black evangelicals, I didn't vote for Donald Trump because of his racial bigotry but because of other issues like the ones you mentioned, the response often back from black evangelicals is, so his racial bigotry wasn't a deal breaker for you, I guess?"

Source: New York Times | Laurie Goodstein

"Dr. Williams-Skinner was one of the religious leaders protesting in the atrium of the Hart Senate Office Building last week, as part of the evangelical social justice group Sojourners. She read from the Gospel of Matthew: “I was hungry, but you did not give me anything to eat.

Source: Audible | Jim Wallis

"I have always believed that we can attain this necessary but difficult goal by getting beyond the superficial and tribal nature of our political debates as they play out in the media and the halls of power. We can accomplish that by identifying the deeper moral and spiritual values that are at stake and lie behind these debates. Don't go left, don't go right, go deeper."

Source: Washington Post | Jim Wallis

"President Trump is an ultimate and consummate worshiper of money, sex and power. American Christians have not really reckoned with the climate he has created in our country and the spiritual obligation we have to repair it. As a result, the soul of our nation and the integrity of the Christian faith are at risk.

Source: Huffington Post | Jim Wallis

"Now this intellectual, emotional, and moral failure as a human being has his finger on the nuclear button. And that is the grreatest threat to America and to the world today. Will other senators stand up for their country and our national security, as Sen. Corker has? How many Bob Corkers are there – how many Republicans will continue to make their Faustian bargain with a president who will promote the economic interests of their wealthy donors?

Source: Boston Globe | Victoria McGrane

"Warren is well known for her acrid take on Wall Street money power, on the Trump presidency, and on all the forces in American life that, in her view, deny equal opportunity to all. Much less well known is Warren's relationship with God.

"A year or two after her election to the Senate, the Rev. Jim Wallis, president and chief executive of Sojourners, a liberal magazine and Christian social justice movement based in Washington, invited her to address a leadership summit his group hosts every three years. Matthew 25 was the text about which she chose to speak.

Source: Christian Today | Joseph Hartropp

"The march was intended as a faith-based protest against hate crimes and discrimination, held on the 54th anniversary of Martin Luther King Jr's March on Washington, in which King made the infamous 'I have a dream speech'. However, the recent white supremacist violence in Charlottesville, Virginia – and its political fallout – escalated the import of and interest in the event.​

Source: Religion News Service | Adelle M. Banks

"Wearing stoles, robes and yarmulkes, the particpants proceeded Monday (Aug. 28) on a 1.7-mile route from the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial to the Justice Department. Organizers estimated close to 3,000 ministers took part, a larger turnout than suggested by the title of the event: 'One Thousand Ministers March for Justice.'

Source: Huffington Post | Jim Wallis

I heard Matthew Dowd say that on “This Week with George Stephanopoulos” this past Sunday. I met Dowd recently. He is a former George W. Bush advisor, and told me he is a Catholic from my hometown of Detroit. He is right. These are indeed about basic choices that are not just political, but moral. It’s time to make some choices.

 

Source: Crux | Dennis Sadowski

WASHINGTON, D.C. - Christian faith leaders pledged anew to build a “circle of protection” around vital social programs identified for deep spending cuts under President Donald Trump’s fiscal year 2018 budget, saying their action is consistent with biblical principles.
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Source: The Washington Post | Jim Wallis

In an unfortunate exchange during a confirmation hearing last week, Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) stepped on a land mine of religious liberty and Christian theology. He challenged a Budget Office nominee’s belief that “Muslims … stand condemned,” a statement taken from a blog post he had written about “the centrality of Christ” for a religious magazine during a controversy at his alma mater, Wheaton College. Nominee Russell Vought had been a professor at Wheaton, and he ventured into the question of Muslim vs.

Source: The New York Times | Laurie Goodstein

In Nashville, a crowd of ministers carrying palm fronds occupied the governor’s office during Holy Week, demanding the expansion of Medicaidto cover more of the uninsured.
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Source: Huffington Post | Ilgin Yorulmaz

A quiet but powerful march took place in Philadelphia last week, indicating a new direction in the faith-driven environmental justice movement in America. 
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Alaura Carter, the Climate Justice Associate at Sojourners and a member of the committee that organized the People’s Climate March in Washington D.C. in April, thinks that environment, like any other national issue, has a racial component.

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